ADD, Addictions, Dyslexia, Human Behaviour, Human Nature, inspirational, Publishing joys, SUCCESS

Oh-so-human People Hood

Launched by our day of birth, we are delivered into the human race, each of us having joined the people hood association.  We live akin having basic nutritional needs for health, growth and survival.  Yet, unequal “nutrient” measures are required for our individual learning stimulus and potential mind development.  Particular learning styles can be as distinct as our bodies, personalities, preferences and capabilities.  

We are all equipped to learn as we grow, but sometimes we cannot advance as per certain teaching methods.  Everyone possesses adequacies—like definitive fingerprints—those distinguished abilities must be fostered.  Since our human bodies are not resembled exactly alike, not even identical twins, it makes sense that our human minds are assembled differently as well.  Consider various character traits and personal likes and dislikes people have for foods, hobbies, clothes, music, literature….  Perceptions of our environment differ, it’s obvious, our homes reflect our individualism as well as the artistic creations we savour.  

Although inter mutual similarities form assemblages, those groups consist of personal contributions.  Creative-minded artists orchestrate the vast entertainment industry with unique styles; actors, comedians, musicians….  Interior decorators have diverse flair; writers, their own voice…while other faculties include a range of technicians, lawyers, scientists; foods industry….  All an asset to their field.  Point made, I’m sure, saying that people hood is balanced out by a plethora of talents and specific contributions which make up divergent categories in societal links.  Speculate, though.  Does everybody learn in the same manner to find their niche?  

If absolutely everyone could learn the way they think, if you will, imagine the productivity and confidence within each person.  There were/are individuals so unique in their thinking that, “Eureka!”, mind-blowing concepts continue to be developed; lifesaving medication and technology, communications devices, travel modes just to mention a few.  Diverse-thinking historical figures pushed against the grain to be taken seriously, and prevailed.  They are gone, yet their outstanding contributions, not forgotten.

 The five senses contribute significantly to our learning, and more fundamentally, our individual impressions of what we’re sensing react to convey information about our environment and produce thoughts constantly.  Perhaps we take our sight, hearing, tactile sensitivities, olfactory glands and taste buds for granted, but still, without the five sensations, touch being the most important, human contact would be deficient in gratifying communication encounters.  People who are lacking one or more of the five senses have heightened awareness of their existing senses and learn to utilize their abilities.  When an individual has one or more learning differences or disabilities, their ability in another area or areas is accentuated and those proficiencies should be encouraged and promoted.  But for several reasons, this does not usually happen.  

 Numerous students are stressed in a world of do-it-or-fail.  But, if students’ learning styles, talents and strengths were recognized and given precedence over whole curriculum styles and students’ particular weaknesses, perhaps everyone would love school.  Not to say that one’s weak areas should be ignored, particularly reading, but forced techniques for the sake of the whole-system curriculum—are not learned—they’re resented.  Frustrated students can attest to the width of curriculum cracks they’re slipping through.   

Nonetheless, in comparison to “old school,” the educational methods are improving, slow but sure.  Now, even though the system is still designed for masses of students as a whole and integration still applies, LDs are finally being recognized as an alternative learning style and our western culture is beginning to realize an ancient truth: people have individual, unique minds.  LD strengths are noticed and commended more than before.  Children and adults alike now have the opportunity for equal rights in their education.  

Adults, listen, be encouraged if you learn differently than others, whether you’re young or matured.  It’s special to be in the minority because LD persons, past and present, have contributed greatly to society.  Google famous LD people and see for yourself.  Our passionate interests are most usually indicative of our natural gifts and talents.  Explore yourself.   Your success will still require time, effort and practice, as with anyone else, regardless of learning style, so pursue what you feel you are good at.

Myself, I think and do differently, and it’s not always easy to find passage in the sea with my learning-style compass.  It takes patient navigating, but with a ship constructed of diligence, I have sailed into a “The world!—she’s’ a-round!” discovery of reachable, fulfilling accomplishments.  My diagnoses of ADD, dyslexia and NVD opened my world up, and I wrote a novel. My editor waded through the errors, bless him for bringing it up to standards.

If I can do sail the LD sea, trust me, you can too.  I actually obtained a Children’s Writing diploma (just needed extra time); I have taught my curriculum development,  at my local Fanshawe college as an evening interest course. I have had several articles published in this newsletter and I’m constructing a poetry chapbook.  Receiving an educational awards spurred me on.    

Embark upon your journey.  Pack unlimited positive attitude supplies and claim your discovery.  A precious diamond is first hidden in a lump of hard, black coal, then uncovered, it’s worth something.  Remember that.

I wrote They All Wore Black, a meaningful story. Because I could. There are just days to my publishing goal. Find more about it here:
https//www.facebook.com/PennersPen88/

 

Advertisements
Standard
Dyslexia, encouragement, Human Behaviour, Human Nature, information, Uncategorized

LD or DL: Learning Disabilities or Different Learning

Some call them learning disabilities. They are not. They’re learning differences; a person is differently abled.

I have dyslexia. Sure, I have to triple check for reversals, and spelling errors light up red lines in my manuscripts and Facebook posts, but I’m not a disabled writer.

In fact, dyslexia enables my aptitude for descriptive writing and character development. I see scenarios in my mind, and I hear what characters are saying. I feel their joy, fear, courage, and agony. Emotions swell like surfers’ waves on pages. My imagination is prolific. I see in images, not words. I record with my fingertips, usually hunched over my keyboard in a deep concentration as I take on the fly-on-the-wall role.

This and outstanding spacial skills are the gifts of dyslexia. I’m a good shot; I’ll win all those stuffed animals at the fair with a flimsy gun, and I hang things on my walls in an even row or estimate space and size with no measuring tape.

I am able to read and write, I just have a different way of doing these things. And I ingest a lot of caffeine. It’s one of my coping tools. Cheers!

Standard
encouragement, Human Nature, information, inspirational, Mistakes

Brilliance of Dyslexia?

Despite the near disabling aspects of it, it’s not a disability at all, rather an outstanding ability. Once it is discovered and nurtured, the brilliance of dyslexia will present.

I gleaned much information and encouragement at age 39 when I was diagnosed with the help of ATN Access Inc.

 If more were known about dyslexia when I started school in 1968, over time, my skills and passion for writing would have developed with less suffocating in my own defeatism.

In grade one I was terribly confused by the compound word into during the read aloud participation. I remember my tingling cheeks and swishing in my ears when the other kids started whispering the word with impatience. I also remember in grade three when I was sent to the office for “clowning around.” I wrote “Wook book fro Writinp” on the cover of my new notepad. I can still see that, it was bold, a black marker, because writing was something I wanted to do well. This happened frequently, and I was labeled as “a slow learner.” Outside of the classroom, sitting on the hall bench, I recall the coat hooks jabbing my head while an unknown adult tried to teach me math, but it was not unlike classroom instruction, just s-l-o-w-e-r. In the 60s and 70s, we kids with learning differences were just labeled slow and treated like someone ought to be there to scrape pudding off our chins at lunch.

To this day I write form instead of from, top for pot, left for felt, gob for dog and so on. I have edited reversed sentences also. I reverse numbers, too. Some days are worse than others. I write, though, and I accept the fumbling process. Autocorrect is mostly hilarious, but the spelling and grammar police on computers these days make it tolerable. Well, mostly. I do have to proofread my work repeatedly, then when I feel I’m finished with the challenge, I have my computer read it to me, still finding errors.

 So why is this learning disability called a gift? What’s to celebrate about dyslexia? C’mon—it’s devastating! Isn’t it? And it’s genetic, too? Don’t parents feel guilty passing this “affliction” on to their children? How can it be overcome? Or can it? Should it? 

Let’s sift through an article, “The Gift of Dyslexia,” I read back in 2003 by Alanna Mitchell. You can decide if being dyslexic is being gifted or ruined.

Interestingly, the hemispheres of a dyslexic’s brain are more symmetrical than that of non dyslexic persons. Affected persons have difficulty reading; however, the symmetry is perfect for other complex brain functions involving images and three dimensions. Incredible photography doesn’t just happen, it’s a skill. Outstanding artists have the skill, too. Perhaps they’re not all dyslexic, but artistic imagery, even creative literary art is possibly a flourishing talent for those who are dyslexic. Another perk is excelling at spacial perception, like seeing the trick of optical illusions, and catching moving objects as small as a set of keys. Sports are played well by the ones with symmetrical brains.

Also, dyslexics do not seem to sort through information in a direct, sequential way, rather a variety of things are sorted at the same time, rapidly. This gives them the edge on strategy. Throughout history, many people who are now understood as having been dyslexic, made dauntless advances in science, art, music, politics, and sports. Among the greats are Albert Einstein, Leonardo da Vinci, Michelangelo, Alexander Graham Bell, and Winston Churchill. 

Incidentally, a little off subject, if you look these people up for ADD or ADHD and bipolar disorder, a lot of them will be listed as having them with dyslexia. Learning differences (brain variances) share within themselves, if that makes sense. If you know you have one diverse aspect, you probably have three. Also, some of our favourite authors have learning differences including dyslexia, like Agatha Christie and F. Scott Fitzgerald. There are many if you google “famous dyslexic authors.”

The sixteen-year-old, Nicholas Carson, featured in the article, “The Gift of Dyslexia,” didn’t read until he was twelve. He had reported that school was still difficult. It was said then that he thinks in pictures and the school was run by “word thinkers.” So he felt alone in his imagery thinking, yet understood he was also gifted.

The point is that dyslexics have a built-in three-dimensional imagination. They have multifaceted perceptions in varying situations. Try to understand that when a dyslexic carpenter is designing a building, they’re are able to visualize their plan, spin it around and explore all angles from the inside, although it’s troublesome to do this with flat objects like blueprints on paper.

Here’s an example. The letter b from a straight on view is a two-dimentional b. But from behind it’s a d. From above a p, and below, it’s a q. All of these variations are seen at the same time by dyslexics, hence the reading reversals and writing errors. On the other hand, a dyslexic’s stellar imagination can create a compelling story, novel, or poem. We record our mind’s eye imagery. It gives a whole new meaning to the phrase descriptive writing.

Dyslexic persons are highly creative, imaginative, athletic, and artistic. It has been established that they calculate thoughts so quickly, they usually don’t understand how they arrived at an answer. This also goes for conversation whereas another’s thought is correctly interpreted before the person has finished explaining something.

Dyslexia then, to me, is a gift. Work with it, not against it, and the perks shine through.

 Please don’t imagine curing my reversals, they are my edge, as backwards as that seems. Understand my ways and accept they’re different. I’m not slow. I’m built for speed, and that sometimes slows me down.

Standard