encouragement, Human Nature, information, inspirational, Mistakes

Brilliance of Dyslexia?

Despite the near disabling aspects of it, it’s not a disability at all, rather an outstanding ability. Once it is discovered and nurtured, the brilliance of dyslexia will present.

I gleaned much information and encouragement at age 39 when I was diagnosed with the help of ATN Access Inc.

 If more were known about dyslexia when I started school in 1968, over time, my skills and passion for writing would have developed with less suffocating in my own defeatism.

In grade one I was terribly confused by the compound word into during the read aloud participation. I remember my tingling cheeks and swishing in my ears when the other kids started whispering the word with impatience. I also remember in grade three when I was sent to the office for “clowning around.” I wrote “Wook book fro Writinp” on the cover of my new notepad. I can still see that, it was bold, a black marker, because writing was something I wanted to do well. This happened frequently, and I was labeled as “a slow learner.” Outside of the classroom, sitting on the hall bench, I recall the coat hooks jabbing my head while an unknown adult tried to teach me math, but it was not unlike classroom instruction, just s-l-o-w-e-r. In the 60s and 70s, we kids with learning differences were just labeled slow and treated like someone ought to be there to scrape pudding off our chins at lunch.

To this day I write form instead of from, top for pot, left for felt, gob for dog and so on. I have edited reversed sentences also. I reverse numbers, too. Some days are worse than others. I write, though, and I accept the fumbling process. Autocorrect is mostly hilarious, but the spelling and grammar police on computers these days make it tolerable. Well, mostly. I do have to proofread my work repeatedly, then when I feel I’m finished with the challenge, I have my computer read it to me, still finding errors.

 So why is this learning disability called a gift? What’s to celebrate about dyslexia? C’mon—it’s devastating! Isn’t it? And it’s genetic, too? Don’t parents feel guilty passing this “affliction” on to their children? How can it be overcome? Or can it? Should it? 

Let’s sift through an article, “The Gift of Dyslexia,” I read back in 2003 by Alanna Mitchell. You can decide if being dyslexic is being gifted or ruined.

Interestingly, the hemispheres of a dyslexic’s brain are more symmetrical than that of non dyslexic persons. Affected persons have difficulty reading; however, the symmetry is perfect for other complex brain functions involving images and three dimensions. Incredible photography doesn’t just happen, it’s a skill. Outstanding artists have the skill, too. Perhaps they’re not all dyslexic, but artistic imagery, even creative literary art is possibly a flourishing talent for those who are dyslexic. Another perk is excelling at spacial perception, like seeing the trick of optical illusions, and catching moving objects as small as a set of keys. Sports are played well by the ones with symmetrical brains.

Also, dyslexics do not seem to sort through information in a direct, sequential way, rather a variety of things are sorted at the same time, rapidly. This gives them the edge on strategy. Throughout history, many people who are now understood as having been dyslexic, made dauntless advances in science, art, music, politics, and sports. Among the greats are Albert Einstein, Leonardo da Vinci, Michelangelo, Alexander Graham Bell, and Winston Churchill. 

Incidentally, a little off subject, if you look these people up for ADD or ADHD and bipolar disorder, a lot of them will be listed as having them with dyslexia. Learning differences (brain variances) share within themselves, if that makes sense. If you know you have one diverse aspect, you probably have three. Also, some of our favourite authors have learning differences including dyslexia, like Agatha Christie and F. Scott Fitzgerald. There are many if you google “famous dyslexic authors.”

The sixteen-year-old, Nicholas Carson, featured in the article, “The Gift of Dyslexia,” didn’t read until he was twelve. He had reported that school was still difficult. It was said then that he thinks in pictures and the school was run by “word thinkers.” So he felt alone in his imagery thinking, yet understood he was also gifted.

The point is that dyslexics have a built-in three-dimensional imagination. They have multifaceted perceptions in varying situations. Try to understand that when a dyslexic carpenter is designing a building, they’re are able to visualize their plan, spin it around and explore all angles from the inside, although it’s troublesome to do this with flat objects like blueprints on paper.

Here’s an example. The letter b from a straight on view is a two-dimentional b. But from behind it’s a d. From above a p, and below, it’s a q. All of these variations are seen at the same time by dyslexics, hence the reading reversals and writing errors. On the other hand, a dyslexic’s stellar imagination can create a compelling story, novel, or poem. We record our mind’s eye imagery. It gives a whole new meaning to the phrase descriptive writing.

Dyslexic persons are highly creative, imaginative, athletic, and artistic. It has been established that they calculate thoughts so quickly, they usually don’t understand how they arrived at an answer. This also goes for conversation whereas another’s thought is correctly interpreted before the person has finished explaining something.

Dyslexia then, to me, is a gift. Work with it, not against it, and the perks shine through.

 Please don’t imagine curing my reversals, they are my edge, as backwards as that seems. Understand my ways and accept they’re different. I’m not slow. I’m built for speed, and that sometimes slows me down.

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encouragement, Human Behaviour, Human Nature

Disciplining Our Parents?

SETTING PARAMETERS ON GENERATIONAL IDEOLOGY

Most kids growing up in before the 80s were disciplined by conventional rules. Being taught right from wrong was the norm, and we knew to respect our elders. We lived within boundaries or else.

We conventionalized children developed into adults; we taught our own children boundaries to live by and leave the nest with. But our elderly parents and in-laws, at some point, as they’re intertwined in our lives, now need parameters set by we whom have lived by Mom and Dad’s theories. And isn’t it rather remarkable how take a step back and dissect this phenomena of surpassing our parents in ways of our thinking? We raised our kids according to our beliefs formed in the societal realms surrounding updated, cogent information, yet some of our parents still insist on theirs. They interfere in ways that they don’t seem to understand are intrusive, and we know there will be friction when we get the nerve to set boundaries—our limits, our wishes, our way of thinking. And it’s difficult since we still have love and respect for our moms and dads. We are cognizant of their feelings, and we understand that setting parameters obscures the rules and notions they believe to be fair—because their parents taught them that way, and so on. Not to say the way children were raised is wrong entirely. There are concepts, though, that we don’t live by in this century.

However, this is the path of generational ideology, and it isn’t always ideal. For instance, perhaps it was okay for our grandparents to walk in without knocking. In this day and age, is there too much going on in the outside world to have our internal, private world compromised? Is it all right for our parents to invite themselves to dinner, make that dinner and bring it over expecting that the rich and cholesterol ridden meal is acceptable when medication for high cholesterol is combatting clogged arteries, and the abundant sugar used in the meal will no doubt affect the blood sugar of one striving to combat blood sugar issues? How do we say no? We’re always trying to prevent the emotional upheavals. And here we all thought that being a grown up was something we couldn’t wait for.

God tells humans to respect our parents. And we can still do that and also set a do-not-cross line. We do that respectfully, but if we let problems go too long, we’ll be too angry to be respectful. Being truthful is necessary, and we best let our parents and in-laws know that we aren’t children anymore. We have developed and learned and made our own adult choices outside the nest, and really, isn’t that the point of leaving the sheltered life? It is far from easy to tell the truth sometimes; however, eventually it just might be the only way to be set free of disappointments with living one lifestyle in the presence of our parents and in-laws then catching up on our own lifestyle in our own time. A ‘no thank you,’ and a polite explanation may or may not work. It depends on how long it’s been a problem. I’m not a professional in the field of advice. I only know what difficulties I have endured. I’m still establishing the ‘no thank you’ concept. God, please, p-a-a-a-a-l-e-e-e-se help me….

God bless, thanks for reading~

Lynn

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encouragement, Human Nature

Today is Tomorrow’s Memory

SOUL SOOTHERS

Life is grand, but only if you live it.

Laugh out loud when it bubbles up instead of holding it in, see reactions from people and laugh again. Watch and see how many start laughing with you. Roll your pants up after a summer rainstorm and walk in sticky mud. We’re all washable, try it. Drive for miles if you need to and hike the forest and surround yourself with fluttering leaves, kiss the breeze as if it were life’s breath. Play a fun trick on a friend and giggle. Dive into relaxing music and listen like you’re a part of it. Watch a sunrise and sunset within the same day.  Forgive someone and set yourself free of bitterness. Mostly, remember that love is the forever available fruit within reach of every hand, and be at peace with today, because today is tomorrow’s memory.

Life is grand, so find ways to really, truly live.  Good memories can get we humans through a bad day, so assemble good recollections of some kind every day and make a smile easy to achieve every tomorrow.

Thanks for reading~

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encouragement, Spiritual

Sky Dad

WE HUMANS NEED LEADERSHIP AND RESCUE

It’s just my opinion I suppose, but the old-fashioned mode of expression makes me slump a bit. I mean the phrases still used in this day and age regarding our human lives and whether we will live contentedly forever beyond our earthy form. Will we be welcomed into the sublime afterlife when we give up our ghost? The key phrase of language for this seems too outdated to me.

It sounds so old-school to me when people ask if I’m “saved,” and I want to correct them and tell them, “Yes, I’ve been rescued.” Rescued from the belief that death is the end of my soul, exempt from the idea that God is only there for religious people who follow a sect, and liberated from an eternity of lamentations. Rescued means bailed out, deliverance, redemption. Saved means rescued.

I don’t ask people if they’ve been “saved.” I find in this day and age, anyone one who hasn’t cashed in their free offer for having a life jacket in the troubled waters of life, and a reservation for a peaceful place afterwards, probably hasn’t had it  explained in laid-back terms. I’m someone who simply follows my Brother, Jesus, because a relationship has been developed with Him, thanks to Sky Dad. It isn’t about a collection of people who’ve taught me about their particular doctrine. But what if I’m not into a set of rituals and a segregated doctrine to adhere to, and if I don’t dress in my Sunday’s finest or have beads to help me pray… am I going to spend my eternity in a spiritual realm of evil and suffering?

God is not an obscured, big, old, mean face in the sky looking down waiting the smite humans who make mistakes. God is my Sky Dad, Light. Light is good. Light, as we’ve found out through science, is miraculously amazing, healing, and necessary to all life on this planet as we know it, except of course mould and select creatures. God is Light. Light is to dispel darkness. From Light comes enlightenment—for understanding a problem or mystery. God is Light, that beacon in the dense fog to guide us on the vast and choppy sea of life.

The human race is an out of control species. We need a leader, we always have. Our Free-will allows our choices; however, coupled up with the ego, we humans need The Light to rescue us from our own demise. Or we can steer out little boats into darkness, no compass, no provisions. Why does it have to be so dark without God, though? Because He wants us to depend on Him the way ducklings follow their mama and learn to swim and eat and survive, bringing forth new generations to learn the same skills.  Sky Dad wants us to hang out with our Devine Brother He created, discover this dependable friendship in Him. Find guidance and dispel loneliness, to ask and be pleasantly surprised to receive what we need. Our Divine Brother died a cruel, torturous, and disturbing death to attach us to Sky Dad in a way we humans would never accomplish on our own.

I could go on, but I think I made key point about old-school phrases. I’m rescued. My Divine Brother, Jesus, is my most dependable buddy, counsellor, confidant, and protector. My Sky Dad has a handle on my life. He always did, I just had to discover that my way when I was 14-years-old. The bible has been handy, too. Proverbs is my favourite book. “Acknowledge me in all your ways and I will keep your path straight.” Proverbs, 3: 6, and I’m grateful to be rescued.

© L. P. Penner, 2015

It’s labour day Monday. I’m off to do pretty much nothing strenuous. I don’t think I’ll even make the bed. Have a hunky dory day. 🙂 God Bless~

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encouragement, Spiritual

Tenacity Isn’t Genetic

PATIENCE IS HARD EARNED (fiction)

Me:
I seem to be lacking the tolerance I need. Waiting in a grocery store line up is okay. Waiting for a prescription to be filled isn’t too bad. Waiting to hear back from a publisher is ridiculous. I can hardly stand it.

Jesus:
You do lack patience. You couldn’t even wait out nine months to be born.

Me:
Don’t get me wrong, Jesus, I am not asking for patience. I did that once. It wasn’t pretty.

Jesus:
Trials are not festive, nor is a hurried spirit joyful.

Me:
It’s hard to have joy inside when I keep getting disappointed day after day—because the wait was supposed to be six months…ish, I guess. It is only the seventh, though, isn’t it? I guess I am impatient. I am confident they’ll let me know either way. They let my friend know. It was a no, but they got back to her. When, though?

Jesus:
Everything happens for a reason, everything has its own time. A hurried spirit loses hope.

Me:
I haven’t completely lost hope. But I’m getting irritated.

Jesus:
You are a measure beyond having good faith in me. We can determine your patience further.

Me:
Isn’t that what we’re doing now?

Jesus:
That is what I am doing now. You are preoccupied with negative thoughts.

Me:
Oh. Okay, so how am I supposed to just get more faith about this?

Jesus:
Be farsighted about the eventual outcome. I said I would help you. Do you trust me?

Me:
Yeah, but…

Jesus:
Do you trust me?

Me:
I do, it’s just that…

Jesus:
Do you trust me?

Me:
Okay, you’re right. You’ve taken me through a lot. I just have to wait.

Jesus:
And trust while you wait. Your endurance is being built upon. I know your needs now and for the future. Do you not have an appointment is a half hour?

Me:
Oh! Yes I do! Thanks for reminding me. I’ll talk to you later.

Jesus:
I’ll always be here. I love you.

Me:
Aw, I love you, too. Thanks for making me feel better.

Jesus:
Anytime, Little Lamb. Have a good appointment~

© Lynn P. Penner, 2015

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